• Login:
Welcome, Register Here
follow PropertyTalk on facebook follow PropertyTalk on twitter Newsletter follow PropertyTalk on LinkedIn follow PropertyTalk on facebook
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 21 to 24 of 24
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Cyberspace
    Posts
    5,816

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by McDuck View Post
    They are passengers, not drivers, to use an automotive metaphor.
    Like in a taxi. They tell the driver where to be at the end of the ride. IE Maximum profit.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,074

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by McDuck View Post
    You are absolutely incorrect on the first part.

    Because the old store was part of the community, social forces kept it honest.
    The storekeeper had to walk down the main street and look at his customers every day.
    His children played with theirs.
    He was part of the town. He was them. This is one of the main advantages of local ownership and control.
    Great feedback mechanism.
    So no community store ever uses it's monopoly to make an extra buck?

    No one (sensible) opens up in direct competition with Joe across the road unless they think they can do it better, more efficiently, but most of all make a sustainable profit. Therefore Joe is either taking advantage of his monopoly or should be doing things better, more efficiently.

    Skinny Vs 2degrees - 2degrees enters market to challenge the big boys (Spark/Vodophone) monopoly. Big boy, Spark, introduces Skinny to undercut 2degrees in an attempt to sink 2degrees and regain the big boys monopoly. Spark subsidizes Skinny and gives it access to its network. Spark not worried about losing customers to Skinny as they know that once 2degrees folds they can envelope Skinny back into the Spark brand and pricing. Despite Spark's assault, 2degrees holds on. Consumers win. Support the little fella.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    2,735

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Keys View Post
    Like in a taxi. They tell the driver where to be at the end of the ride. IE Maximum profit.
    I was thinking it was more like being abducted and thrown in the back of a prison type van, with blacked out windows.

    But we'll go with Taxi, to keep you out of panic mode.

    So, lets look at it then.

    You want to buy some shares in a big company, so you can tell the driver where to go.

    How will you do it?

    Right now.

    What are the actual practical steps Mr or Mrs Keys will take?

    Walk me through your process.

    Teach me how you will direct the thing.

    What destination will you choose?
    How will you make sure the rout is best?
    How will you even know what way you are going?
    Lets say it's an unfamiliar city, most punters couldn't recognise the hidden business landscape if you drew it in front of them.
    Last edited by McDuck; 13-06-2019 at 06:50 AM.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    2,735

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Learning View Post
    So no community store ever uses it's monopoly to make an extra buck?

    No one (sensible) opens up in direct competition with Joe across the road unless they think they can do it better, more efficiently, ...

    ....
    Sorry, I answered on a first come first served basis.
    Your response is equally valuable.

    On your first point.
    I do travel a lot.
    I can't say I've found too many small town places with wonky prices.
    There was one second hand shop half way down the north island with prices almost double what you would expect.
    It was either a tourist trap or the people were deluded, the shop is probably closed now.

    Usually I find small places are selling things too cheaply.
    When I point this out, they just say that the locals won't come back if they put the prices up.

    There are only three petrol stations in Auckland that are price scalping.
    I just steer around them.

    There is one dairy that is substituting low quality product but charging what the high quality product would cost.
    Steer around.

    There are two food places that are under pricing.
    I recommend them to everyone.

    There is one place that makes an exceptional product and charges a higher price.
    I treat myself on occasion.

    Adam Smith's invisible hand seems to live in my DNA.

    On your second point.
    Many New New Zealanders, open up businesses with the goal of merger survival.
    Utilising family members as workers.
    Their reward is not dollars, but escape.
    Last edited by McDuck; 15-06-2019 at 01:00 PM.


 

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. A tale of two platforms
    By sidinz in forum Finance, legal and tax (NZ)
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-05-2016, 09:13 PM
  2. A Nail of a Tale
    By Perry in forum Forum Funnies
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 30-06-2015, 03:52 PM
  3. Owner’s P-Lab nightmare – What are tell tale signs?
    By props4u in forum Property Management
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 08-08-2013, 07:13 PM
  4. Buying in Central Auckland Suburbs around train stations
    By Marej in forum Property Investment (NZ)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 23-04-2012, 09:22 PM
  5. Another educational tale about mediation
    By imd6662 in forum Tenant Stuff (NZ)
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 04-11-2009, 06:52 PM
  6. A Tale of Two Tolls
    By Perry in forum Tenant Stuff (NZ)
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 28-09-2009, 12:37 PM
  7. A Tale of Twin Drivers
    By Perry in forum Forum Funnies
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-06-2009, 08:01 PM
  8. A Tale of Two Depressions
    By jenny_pt in forum Regions News (USA)
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-04-2009, 02:03 PM
  9. The Radio Stations thread
    By sarahk in forum Forum Funnies
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-10-2005, 12:06 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •