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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    2,525

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    Drelly, yes,
    True. Not always.
    This is where you need good numbers and good sense to see the real picture.
    Kiwi fruit orchard owners would have a totally different experience than say people going to get food or it support in Auckland.
    Last edited by McDuck; 08-01-2017 at 01:42 PM.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    5,028

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    Quote Originally Posted by Learning View Post
    My crystalball's as foggy as yours. It could be a short dip just before a massive growth like 2012 or it could be the beginning of a crash like 2007. No one's going to know until after it's happened. each camp has its own evidence and fact based opinions.

    How long do you wait to see if the smoke is going to become an inferno or fizzle out? How long is a piece of string?
    Ahh yes, the great house price crash of 2007. We remember it well.

    DFTBA

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    5,028

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Anthonyacat View Post
    I promise houses will be worth more in 15-20 years than they are now.

    Surely you're investing for the long term, right?
    Promise, as in guarantee? Careful now...

    Chart: Accumulated (residential) Land Price Changes in Tokyo's Central Wards and Central
    Osaka City



    Source : http://tochi.mlit.go.jp/h19hakusho/c...u_1-1_eng.html
    DFTBA

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    9,607

    Default

    Japan makes for a fascinating study.
    For all its' economic woes it seems to still do well overall.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    1,434

    Default

    Does anyone have any data on Japan's property prior to the end of days? Would be interesting to see whether their market was 'normal' before then.

    But Wayne - one really has to wonder, what good do higher property prices do for an economy? Surely if land and housing were cheap, our young would be able to afford a house early, and get on with spending massive amounts on furnishings and holidays. In the case of Japan, holidays don't even subtract from GDP much - they love travelling internally, and in nearby Asia.
    AAT Accounting Services - Property Specialist Accounting - AATAccounting.co.nz
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  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    9,607

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthonyacat View Post
    Does anyone have any data on Japan's property prior to the end of days? Would be interesting to see whether their market was 'normal' before then.

    But Wayne - one really has to wonder, what good do higher property prices do for an economy? Surely if land and housing were cheap, our young would be able to afford a house early, and get on with spending massive amounts on furnishings and holidays. In the case of Japan, holidays don't even subtract from GDP much - they love travelling internally, and in nearby Asia.
    Really I wasn't even thinking of property prices in Japan - I agree that rising property prices don't do anything for the economy except make us more indebted.
    I was really thinking of the deflations etc that have been going through for decades.
    People seem to have adjusted and just get on with life.
    Of course I haven't studied this so have probably missed lots.

  7. #47

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    Japan's population will fall by 30% in the next 30 years. Already towns are being abandoned and folks who "inherit" homes wind up footing a bill to demolish them. Future demand is priced into current pricing. A town I go camping in when there in August is giving away homes. The bubble in the 80's was due to a massive influx of wealth from industrialisation in the previous 15 years and very loose lending policies.
    Free online Property Investment Course from iFindProperty, a residential investment property agency.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    9,607

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick G View Post
    Japan's population will fall by 30% in the next 30 years. Already towns are being abandoned and folks who "inherit" homes wind up footing a bill to demolish them. Future demand is priced into current pricing. A town I go camping in when there in August is giving away homes. The bubble in the 80's was due to a massive influx of wealth from industrialisation in the previous 15 years and very loose lending policies.
    All to do with an ageing population.
    It is hitting Japan 1st but others will follow.

    Very loose lending policies - where did I see that recently?

  9. #49

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    Japan failed to counter this with any kind of immigration. Very Xenophobic unfortunately.
    Free online Property Investment Course from iFindProperty, a residential investment property agency.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    2,047

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick G View Post
    Japan failed to counter this with any kind of immigration. Very Xenophobic unfortunately.
    How do you mean 'failed'? They made a choice to take a different path, the outcome of this will be interesting, as almost everyone else is taking the immigration route to fill the demographic hole, but I'm not convinced it's going to work out as intended.


 

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