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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Tauranga
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    Gas would require an extractor fan as well otherwise moisture plus harmful fumes will remain in the unit. I have a combo microwave its brilliant does a full roast (small sized chicken) perfectly.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Auckland
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    1,898

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    Meals-On-Wheels?
    Who needs an oven.
    The three most harmful addictions are heroin, carbohydrates and a monthly salary - Fred Wilson.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    795

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ahar View Post
    Ha ha...my electrician neighbour told me the exact opposite....the oven draws more power than the cook top
    Yes I was surprised. I questioned this and they said the oven draws heaps of power to warm up then not much after. Makes me wonder what happens if both switched on at the same time.
    An electrician checked the circuit the two ovens would be on and it was just big enough. A hot plate would have needed another circuit. Then I guess the question is, can the house take it if heat pumps etc are all on as well.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    North Shore Auckland
    Posts
    565

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    I understand that fuses will blow when too much power is drawn...this stops the wiring from overheating...a built in safety measure so to speak.

    The fire hazard problem occurs when good folk who become tired of blown fuses, replace the fuse wire with a hairpin or something similar thus resulting in the the wiring overheating (this assumes a good old fashioned fuse and not the modern type...don't know what people do to these to stop them blowing)

    As for what your chap said about the circuit being big enough...I'd been led to believe one of the main problems is the amount of power coming into the property via the cabling from the street....I think my electrician neighbour told my that he only put in a cook top for his own mum because of the limitation on the load that the wiring from the street can carry....this was when I was thinking of doing a granny flat so I paid attention I definitely remember him saying that this cable would have to be "upgraded"

    I really think you need to speak to more than one electrician....I always find it helpful to ask the same question to at least 3 "experts"...bit like getting quotes from 3 tradies
    Last edited by Ahar; 13-07-2015 at 10:45 PM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    10,367

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    All electricians should be well versed in working out the load requirements.
    Generally house main wiring (to the street) are OK up to 63A.
    Each circuits has sufficient protection for that bit of wire - 1mm TPS will be fused (or circuit breaker) at 10A (lighting circuits), 2.5mm for 20A.
    This protects the cable from overheating.
    Then the main lead to the house is fused at the street - this protects the main cable.
    You don't want that one to blow - have to get the power company out to fix - that will take time and probably cost.

    Ovens generally use more than a hob.
    Total load potential for a house generally exceeds what is available - ie if you turned everything on you would have trouble.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    North Shore Auckland
    Posts
    565

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne View Post
    All electricians should be well versed in working out the load requirements.
    Generally house main wiring (to the street) are OK up to 63A.
    Each circuits has sufficient protection for that bit of wire - 1mm TPS will be fused (or circuit breaker) at 10A (lighting circuits), 2.5mm for 20A.
    This protects the cable from overheating.
    Then the main lead to the house is fused at the street - this protects the main cable.
    You don't want that one to blow - have to get the power company out to fix - that will take time and probably cost.

    Ovens generally use more than a hob.
    Total load potential for a house generally exceeds what is available - ie if you turned everything on you would have trouble.
    Wayne....sounds like you are very well versed in all things electrical. Are you an electrician?

    As for your last comment re having problems if you turned everything on..... I assume this is why my neighbour, who is also my electrician, was being very cautious when he advised that the cabling from the street would have to be upgraded if I wanted to install another oven.

    And I can understand why....

    No reputable electrician wants to be in the situation of explaining why the main cabling from the street fused.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    10,367

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    No I am not an electrician but I have done a lot of electrical work.
    When you have your own house you can control what people use and when but when you share with your parents it becomes difficult to tell them not to use the oven when you use yours.

    It's a bit like a socket circuit may be fused at 20A but have many power points capable of 10A each.
    Obviously 3x 2.4kW heater on the circuit will overload it but you would soon work that out.
    But if one of those power points was shared with another person then you get conflict.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    155

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alison View Post
    Hi, we have purchased a property large enough to house my elderly parents, it has a separate wing attached to our own home (it was used as a business and has direct access from the main lounge room of the house) There is a bedroom with ensuite, two other rooms and a huge lounge room which I guess was a board room) It has plumbing already in the lounge area (consented) ready to hook up a kitchenette. I want to know if what I have heard is right? From talking to friends I have heard that we can apply for consent for a kitchenette, or the alternative is to put in a kitchen suitable to their needs without consent then when we eventually sell the property on we have to pull it all out! I also heard that we can sign a statutory declaration with council stating that we will not be 'renting out' or using it for any other purposes other than dependent parents or extended family members. Is this right? What are we allowed to install and what would constitute a kitchenette if we are not allowed a full kitchen? Remembering that the plumbing is all ready there to go for the kitchenette and has been approved, the previous owners didn't get around to completing the job as they have moved due to employment elsewhere. We live in Christchurch NZ. Thank you!
    I had dealings with CCC and was told I can't have this sort of arrangement unless it is a certified granny flat. I would check with council first before installing a kitchen. The second kitchen would compromise your insurance if you don't have permission. Good luck.

  9. #19

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    When you have your own house you can control what people use and when but when you share with your parents it becomes difficult to tell them not to use the oven when you use yours.
    as long as you have a single household (even sharing 2 kitchens) then you can still manage the electrical loads. This is another example of why as long as the occupants belong to the same household then everything is able to be managed, If you turned on every appliance and every heater in your house you could blow the fuse but this is not normal use.

    Occupants of separate households on the other hand deserve and expect to be independent of another's electrical loading?

    I had dealings with CCC and was told I can't have this sort of arrangement unless it is a certified granny flat. I would check with council first before installing a kitchen. The second kitchen would compromise your insurance if you don't have permission.
    and what constitutes a "certified granny flat"?, we have all had such dealings where council scaremonger for their own purposes.

    Do your homework and be very clear as to what the law requires. Make sure all plumbing and gas is by registered plumber/ gasfitter. Make sure all electrical work is certified by registered electrician. keep the paperwork for your protection.

    It is bull shit about insurance being "compromised", unless illegal negligent work causes a fire if this is wrong please provide the basis for the contrary opinion?

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    10,367

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beginner1 View Post
    unless it is a certified granny flat.
    That would be a flat for a 'certified granny'?


 

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