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  1. #1
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    Default Painting tips from the pros

    Sand away flaws
    You have to start with a perfectly smooth surface to end up with perfectly painted walls or woodwork. One pro says that sander would be a more fitting job title than painter, since he spends so much time pushing sandpaper. Sanding levels out spackle or joint-compound patches and flattens ridges around nail holes. Sanding also removes burrs and rough spots in your trim.
    Sand the walls from the baseboard to the ceiling with fine-grit sandpaper on a sanding pole. Then sand horizontally along the baseboard and ceiling. Don't put a lot of pressure on the sanding pole or the head can flip over and damage the wall. Sand woodwork with a sanding sponge to get into crevices.
    "There's one way to find out if a man is honest-ask him. If he says 'yes,' you know he is a crook." Groucho Marx

  2. #2
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    Use tinted primer
    Before the pros paint walls, they fill holes and patch cracks with joint compound. But if you paint directly over the compound, it will suck the moisture out of the paint, giving it a flat, dull look, a problem called "flashing." Those spots will look noticeably different than the rest of the wall. To avoid that, pros prime the walls before painting.
    Instead of using white primer, pros usually have it tinted gray or a color that's similar to the finish paint. Tinted primer does a better job of covering the existing paint color than plain primer, so your finish coat will be more vibrant and may require fewer coats. This is especially true with colors such red or orange, which could require three or more coats without a primer.
    Last edited by muppet; 23-10-2011 at 01:05 PM.
    "There's one way to find out if a man is honest-ask him. If he says 'yes,' you know he is a crook." Groucho Marx

  3. #3
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    Press tape with a putty knife
    When you've finished painting, nothing is more discouraging than discovering that the paint bled through the tape. To avoid the pain-in-the-neck chore of scraping off the paint, do a thorough job of adhering the tape before you start. Apply tape over the wood, then run a putty knife over the top to press down the tape for a good seal. That should stop any paint bleeds.
    Use blue painter's tape instead of masking tape. Masking tape can leave a sticky residue that's hard to clean off. Plus, paint can cause the masking tape to buckle or get wavy, which lets paint run underneath it. Painter's tape can be left on for days (some up to two weeks) and still peel off cleanly. And it stops paint bleed without buckling.
    Last edited by muppet; 23-10-2011 at 01:06 PM.
    "There's one way to find out if a man is honest-ask him. If he says 'yes,' you know he is a crook." Groucho Marx

  4. #4
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    Default

    Eliminate brush and lap marks with paint extender
    The secret to a finish that's free of lap and brush marks is mixing a paint extender — also called a paint conditioner — such as Floetrol, into the paint. This does two things. First, it slows down the paint drying time, giving you a longer window to overlap just-painted areas without getting ugly lap marks that happen when you paint over dried paint and darken the color. Second, paint extender levels out the paint so brush strokes are virtually eliminated — or at least much less obvious. Pros use extenders when painting drywall, woodwork, cabinets and doors. Manufacturer's directions tell you how much extender to add per gallon of paint.

    Don't know what a New Zealand equivalent is.
    Last edited by muppet; 23-10-2011 at 01:06 PM.
    "There's one way to find out if a man is honest-ask him. If he says 'yes,' you know he is a crook." Groucho Marx

  5. #5
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    Scrape a ridge in textured ceilings
    The problem with painting along the edge of textured ceilings is that it's almost impossible to get a straight line along the top of the wall without getting paint on the ceiling bumps. Pros have a simple solution. They run a screwdriver along the perimeter of the ceiling to scrape off the texture. This lets you cut in without getting paint on the ceiling texture. The screwdriver creates a tiny ridge in the ceiling, so the tips of your paint bristles naturally go into it. And you'll never even notice the missing texture.
    "There's one way to find out if a man is honest-ask him. If he says 'yes,' you know he is a crook." Groucho Marx

  6. #6
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    Use canvas dropcloths
    Pros don't use bedsheets as dropcloths, and neither should you. Thin sheets won't stop splatters and spills from seeping through to your flooring. And while plastic can contain spills, the paint stays wet for a long time. That wet paint can (and usually does) find the bottom of your shoes and get tracked through the house.
    Use what the pros use: canvas dropcloths. They're not slippery and they absorb splatters; you should still wipe up large spills or they can bleed through. Unless you're painting a ceiling, you don't need a jumbo-size cloth that fills the entire room. A canvas cloth that's just a few feet wide and runs the length of the wall is ideal for protecting your floor, and it's easy to move.
    "There's one way to find out if a man is honest-ask him. If he says 'yes,' you know he is a crook." Groucho Marx

  7. #7
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    Finish one wall before starting another
    It might seem easy to do all the corners and trim in a room, then go back to roll the walls, but don't. Pros get a seamless look by cutting in one wall — painting along the edges — then immediately rolling it before starting the next. This allows the brushed and the rolled paint to blend together better.
    Cover your paint bucket, tray or container with a damp towel when switching between brushing and rolling to keep your paint and tools from drying out when not in use.
    "There's one way to find out if a man is honest-ask him. If he says 'yes,' you know he is a crook." Groucho Marx

  8. #8
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    Scrape (don't tape) windows
    Don't bother taping windows when painting sashes; it takes a long time and paint usually ends up on the glass anyway. Go ahead and let paint get on the glass. Once it's dry, simply scrape it off with a razor blade. The paint peels off in seconds. Just be careful to not break the paint bond between the wood and the glass. Otherwise, moisture can get on the wood and cause rot.
    "There's one way to find out if a man is honest-ask him. If he says 'yes,' you know he is a crook." Groucho Marx

  9. #9
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    Box paint for consistent color
    The "same" color of paint can vary between cans.That difference can be glaringly obvious if you pop open a new gallon halfway through a wall. To ensure color consistency from start to finish, pros mix their cans of paint in a five-gallon bucket, a process called "boxing."
    Some pros then paint directly out of the bucket. This eliminates the need to pour paint into a roller tray, though the heavy bucket is harder to move.
    "There's one way to find out if a man is honest-ask him. If he says 'yes,' you know he is a crook." Groucho Marx

  10. #10
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    Wash roller covers before you use them
    Whether you buy cheap or expensive roller covers, washing them before their first use gets rid of the fuzz that inevitably comes off once you start painting. Wash them with water and a little bit of liquid soap, and run your hands up and down the covers to pull off any loose fibers, a practice called "preconditioning." You can start using the roller covers right away — you don't need to let them dry.
    "There's one way to find out if a man is honest-ask him. If he says 'yes,' you know he is a crook." Groucho Marx


 

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