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Muriel Newman - NZ's Democratic Vacuum

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  • Muriel Newman - NZ's Democratic Vacuum

    Hi All,

    If you've not read this already - please do it's a must read and sign up to Muriel's newsletter for more of her insights.

    NEW ZEALAND’S DEMOCRATIC VACUUM

    But there’s another consequence of the lockdown that’s worrying health professionals – and that’s the fallout from the disruption of medical services and the cancellation of elective surgery.

    Under Government orders, hospital wards were cleared, surgeries left idle, and Emergency Departments emptied ready for the influx of patients predicted by the Prime Minister’s exaggerated computer models - which proved to be as inaccurate as they were terrifying.

    While an estimated 30,000 New Zealanders who need surgery have been suffering at home, hospitals have been running at around 50 percent capacity for over a month.

    Medical specialist are increasingly concerned the lockdown is costing lives through people failing to seek the treatment they need. A massive drop in pathology testing means serious diseases are going undetected. Patients whose operations were cancelled, risk more serious complications.

    And as a result of the Prime Minister’s relentless message that the only way to keep safe is to stay at home, many people who are feeling ill now think they're not allowed to go to ED because hospitals are only for COVID-19 patients. They also worry that if they did go to hospital, they might catch the virus and die.

    International research shows that in Italy, non-coronavirus deaths have been rising at an alarming rate - the total death count was up six-fold from previous years, with coronavirus accounting for barely a quarter of the increase. An analysis from Spain showed that while mortality rates in some regions had almost doubled, only a fraction of the increase was officially attributed to COVID-19.

    In 2016 a study reported in The Lancet connected at least 250,000 cancer deaths to the 2009 recession. An investigation of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa found that more people died from the indirect effects of the disease, than from the virus itself.

    Without a doubt, the fallout from our Government’s response to the epidemic will be considerably worse than the disease itself. Especially if there are new virus outbreaks, since Jacinda Ardern’s elimination strategy is based on the Government’s on-going ability to order more lockdowns.

    The Prime Minister has taken New Zealand down the path to State control so far and so quickly, that there’s now a very real risk that the architecture of a socialist state will underpin the rebuild. As a result, freedoms that have previously been taken for granted are now under serious threat.

    The signs are already there. Finance Minister Grant Robertson is on record saying: “We must not allow inequality to take hold in our recovery… We need to take this opportunity to tackle those long standing divisions…”

    He sees the state providing strong leadership going forward: “The importance of the role of the state has been underlined by this crisis. It is through a well-funded, highly functional public service, that we have had the ability to coordinate and provide leadership for New Zealanders.”

    And while there appeared to be a slight glimmer of hope of much-needed reform, when he indicated that the Government intends changing the Resource Management Act to stimulate economic activity, according to this week’s NZCPR Guest Contributor economic commentator and former local body councillor Frank Newman, sensible reform is unlikely to materialise.

    Frank explains that while getting rid of the RMA is the only real way to stimulate economic activity and get New Zealand working, the Government will probably exempt itself and leave everyone else to struggle:

    “Although liberating businesses from the RMA is the obvious answer, political self-interest is likely to head the government down a different path. Rather than reform the RMA in a way that benefits business, they are more likely to exempt themselves from its restrictions. This is totally consistent with their view that what they do is for public benefit and what the private sector does is for personal gain.”

    Going forward, it’s now clear that just as Jacinda Ardern used the Christchurch tragedy to impose her gun control agenda onto New Zealand, so too she will use this virus crisis to impose her socialist world-view onto our nation.

    There are already calls for tax rates to be hiked up to 70 cents in the dollar, to force those who are “better-off” to pay for Jacinda Ardern’s lockdown. And it won’t be long before a capital gains tax, estate duties and other tax instruments everyone thought were long dead and buried are resurrected as well.

    This is a very dangerous time for New Zealand.

    Parliament should never have been closed down during this period of emergency rule. At times like this, when a democratic government starts acting like a dictatorship, the voice of the opposition becomes more important than ever.

    National’s leader, Simon Bridges, fell into a political trap when he agreed to chair the Epidemic Response Committee. While there’s no doubt it’s engaging in important work, that role has left the Leader of the Opposition less effective in holding the Government to account.

    He should never have agreed to the suspension of Parliament. He should have recognised the inherent dangers of autocratic rule and demanded that the House reconvene at 2pm each sitting day for a virtual Question Time. That would have allowed for the proper scrutiny of the decisions being taken by the Prime Minister – especially her plan to eliminate the virus.

    Dr Peter Collignon, an infectious diseases physician who advises the Australian government, questions whether eliminating the virus is even possible: “The reality is this virus is everywhere, it’s all around the world. So even if you’re successful for a short period of time, how long do you do this for? Six months? Two years? Invariably, you’re going to get the virus re-introduced.”

    He points out that Australia is doing better than New Zealand without extremist measures.

    There are two clear dangers for New Zealand.

    The first is the virus – or more specifically, the Prime Minister’s strategy of eliminating the virus; how many lockdowns can we endure?

    And the second is our Prime Minister, who fundamentally believes in state control, and is being given a free rein to embed her agenda deep into the heart of our democracy.

    What's your thoughts?
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  • #2
    It's not the virus we need to be scared of.
    The PM is scaring the crap out of people.
    The three most harmful addictions are heroin, carbohydrates and a monthly salary - Fred Wilson.

    Comment


    • #3
      Too many people love being taken care of so unfortunately she's onto a winner.

      cheers,

      Donna
      Last edited by Perry; 25-04-2020, 10:22 AM. Reason: fixed typo
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      • #4
        Really, I’m sorry but this is nonsense. The only reason we are in the position of having very low death rate and hospitals that aren’t overrun is because of the steps that have been taken. Just look at what’s happening in Sweden. It’s not like it’s a choice of health or the economy. Once the virus is widespread many people are too scared to go to shop Or go into crowds so businesses would suffer anyway. Tourism is dead in the whole world, not because of our government. Then there is the completely unacceptable risk to health workers that we see dying of the virus in the US, Uk, Italy etc. do we really want that here? At least now numbers are low and there is no community transmission it is our best chance to transition to a more normal state, though tourism won’t of course.

        Perhaps we now have a fairly unique opportunity to market NZ as the safest place in the world to be for overseas students and older tourists from the northern hemisphere. For anyone who is willing to do the time and pay for 14 days in lockdown before beginning their holiday It seems the logical place to come. Why not make the quarantine experience 5 star providing top quality accommodation, views (Queenstown seems like the obvious place to come into) , food, and some kind of entertainment. If people came in a little bubble of 4 or 6 it wouldn’t be that onerous to be stuck with your friends for 2 weeks. Then they can travel the country in safety. That way we’d get wealthy, retired people with money to spend. Maybe target the former cruise ship Clientele. And students who are going to be here the whole year.
        Last edited by hawkeye; 25-04-2020, 02:23 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Perhaps we now have a fairly unique opportunity to market NZ as the safest place in the world to be for overseas students and older tourists from the northern hemisphere. For anyone who is willing to do the time and pay for 14 days in lockdown before beginning their holiday It seems the logical place to come. Why not make the quarantine experience 5 star providing top quality accommodation, views (Queenstown seems like the obvious place to come into) , food, and some kind of entertainment. If people came in a little bubble of 4 or 6 it wouldn’t be that onerous to be stuck with your friends for 2 weeks. Then they can travel the country in safety. That way we’d get wealthy, retired people with money to spend. Maybe target the former cruise ship Clientele. And students who are going to be here the whole year.
          H E
          you miss the point because of the lockdown we have not been exposed and are not developing the herd immunity we need. We are now in a more dangerous state than most, ironically because we have been too successful in stopping a controlled spread.

          check out what this professor says https://www.theblaze.com/steve-deace...id-19-shutdown

          Comment


          • #6
            Sweden's health system system has coped throughout and it's well over the peak - see the graph. Surely it's good for the world for some countries to have a different strategy?

            I also like how Sweden's response has not been politicised - it's been led by a down to earth Scientist who has also had 30 years in medicine.

            Also not all countries are reporting elderly care homes deaths in their totals - half of Sweden's death toll is elderly folk - here the percentage must be near 99% - if not 100%. What's interesting too as their decision to go down a different path has been popular with Swedes.

            cheers,

            Donna
            SEARCH PropertyTalk, About PropertyTalk

            BusinessBlogs - the best business articles are found here

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by donna View Post
              Sweden's health system system has coped throughout and it's well over the peak - see the graph. Surely it's good for the world for some countries to have a different strategy?
              "Over the peak" maybe a little premature. According to https://www.worldometers.info/corona...ountry/sweden/ they are still climbing the hill. The world is watching closely.

              Originally posted by donna View Post
              Also not all countries are reporting elderly care homes deaths in their totals - half of Sweden's death toll is elderly folk - here the percentage must be near 99% - if not 100%.
              At least 5 of our 18 deaths are unrelated to care homes.
              - A Westcoast woman was the first.
              - A man with the Otago wedding cluster.
              - A South Island woman in her 60's who's underlying condition was the medication she was taking for her arthritis
              - One who'd returned from overseas travel.
              - One from the Matamata pub cluster

              I agree that Cindy's reaction was over the top. She was preparing for a "worst case" scenerio. A guy who works in the MOH is part of our weekly gaming club and we were talking to him just before lockdown. He admitted that the modeling the government were using were unrealistic but the MOH had to present "The worst case" scenario as well as the best guess predictions. Even then they knew that Covid-19 was never going to be a "worst case" virus. But when reporting to a government you can never say never.

              Cindy's "tens of thousands dead" was a highly unlikely "worst case" scenario. Thousands, definitely. Ten thousand, possibly. Tens of thousands? More chance of being hit by an asteroid.

              Still, what's done is done. NZ is now one of the few island countries who could be completely Covid-19 free in a couple months. We then have to police our boarder tougher than North Korea to keep it that way. Until there's a vaccine that is.
              Last edited by Learning; 27-04-2020, 03:32 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Vaccine won't protect the elderly.
                So what does incarcerating the 80% who barely get a sniffle achieve?
                The three most harmful addictions are heroin, carbohydrates and a monthly salary - Fred Wilson.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Why would you say a vaccine wouldn't protect the elderly?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Immunosenescence.
                    The three most harmful addictions are heroin, carbohydrates and a monthly salary - Fred Wilson.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The effectiveness of vaccines degrades with age but they still greatly improves their chances. We don't stick thousands of over 65s with free flu vaccines every year just for the fun of it.

                      You can never protect every individual but you can protect enough. If the virus can't get a foothold it dies before causing an epidemic.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The vast majority of cases are asymptomatic in those under 65.
                        Why would they need to take the risk of a vaccine?
                        And why do they need their civil liberties stripped, their livelihoods destroyed and to be imprisoned?
                        The three most harmful addictions are heroin, carbohydrates and a monthly salary - Fred Wilson.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Why do we need to risk a vaccine? Why not ask the families of elderly in Sweden, Spain, Italy, UK, etc, etc, etc.

                          If any Kiwi wants to live free in NZ after the age of 65 then 90% of everyone else needs to be infected or vaccinated.

                          Lockdown has been too successful. We didn't flatten the curve, we ablitterated it! And now we have the problem that not enough people have been exposed so once it gets back into the community it'll take off and we'll be back at square one.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            ^^ Agree - I think we'll be switching between 2,3, and 4 for some time.

                            Not sure National would want to pick up the mess that will be our economy this election. They'd be wise to let Labour deal with it and then grab it next time around - probably with Luxon at the helm.

                            cheers,

                            Donna
                            SEARCH PropertyTalk, About PropertyTalk

                            BusinessBlogs - the best business articles are found here

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by donna View Post
                              ^^ Agree - I think we'll be switching between 2,3, and 4 for some time.

                              Not sure National would want to pick up the mess that will be our economy this election. They'd be wise to let Labour deal with it and then grab it next time around - probably with Luxon at the helm.

                              cheers,

                              Donna
                              You may not get your wish, if Bridges is smart he needs to keep pushing his agenda, 25k haters on Facebook towards him do not represent the majority.
                              Im picking come September the tide will have turned and the silent majority will head towards the voting booth ..perhaps without the facemasks.

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