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  • #31
    This discussion really impressed me on how much the value and character of the NZ$ has changed since 1974. Initially it was fixed and between 1974 and 1985 it was devalued 4 times and revalued once, finally in 1985 it was floated. In that same time period it went from just over 1.53 to the US$ to around $.56. I will go hunting tonight to see if I can find out how the average salary changed over that same period of time.
    Last edited by Austrokiwi; 12-06-2008, 12:04 AM. Reason: typo
    The mission of any business enterprise should include the aim to develop economic conditions rather than simply react to them.

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by Austrokiwi View Post
      I am not sure I totally agree. Yes if you refer to the average home owner. No for IP The reason I say this is I assume the aim of every investor to beat the rate of return they could get by just putting their money in the bank.

      It is a matter of perspective and what each investor sees as important. It took a bit of digging but the house Kierans parent's purchased in 1974 cost them 428 Gold ozs' The value of the property in 1991 was 230 oz gold. I think that is what the real growth graph shows.

      The figures are approximate and are based on 1974 NZ$gold price as being $28.00 oz and 1991 NZ$650.00 oz
      Fantastic, thanks for doing the digging I was too lazy to do.
      New to property investing? See: Best PropertyTalk Threads for New and Old Investors And/Or:Propertytalk Wiki

      Comment


      • #33
        Olly’s book “The Day the Bubble Bursts” has some interesting things to say about Government interference in the housing market prior to the 1980’s. Unfortunately, I don’t have his book with me so I can’t reference the information. But, it had something to do with mortgage approvals, I believe (its been awhile since I read it).

        I point this out because house prices (purchase price) would be skewed from the past to the present because of this interference. Therefore, if correct, any average or median data would be irrelevant unless corrected for this interference.

        Also, the floating of the dollar vs. the Gold Standard would be another factor that must be corrected for. Just looking at inflation alone would not be enough. There have been some pretty big changes to New Zealand’s economic foundation over the last 40 years.
        Erewhon is still erehwon, I don’t see it changing anytime soon.

        http://exnzpat.blogspot.com/

        Comment


        • #34
          Good point Exnzpat.
          And the conclusion of all this is the old staple of investors anywhere:
          "past performance is no guarantee of future performance"
          New to property investing? See: Best PropertyTalk Threads for New and Old Investors And/Or:Propertytalk Wiki

          Comment


          • #35
            Good point, Monid.
            And that neatly destroys the argument about houses are now un-affordable and will have to drop in price.
            Just because houses were four times the average wage (or whatever) once upon a time is no reason why houses will return to be four times the average wage.

            Comment


            • #36
              Shush Tricky that is an emperor's new clothings I'm hoping the market will believe (that prices have to drop) since it will then be self fulfilling and buying for cashflow will make sense again...

              You are right though counting on a revision to trend might well be just as foolish as counting on the trend being beaten forever (after this could be the new trend).

              Orion's approach looks better and better to me.

              Cheers
              David
              New to property investing? See: Best PropertyTalk Threads for New and Old Investors And/Or:Propertytalk Wiki

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by tricky View Post
                Good point, Monid.
                And that neatly destroys the argument about houses are now un-affordable and will have to drop in price.
                Just because houses were four times the average wage (or whatever) once upon a time is no reason why houses will return to be four times the average wage.

                Unlikely.

                House prices will fall because the majority of New Zealanders holding mortgages cannot afford those mortgages. New Zealanders are overextended. The recession that is about to sweep the world will mean job loss and loan default. Market value will fall below mortgage notes and those holding negatively geared and interest-only-loans will be the first to fall.

                Don’t take my word for it – call your friendly bank manager today and ask him what the bank does when the market value of your home falls below your mortgage note value i.e. the amount you owe. You won’t like the answer.
                Last edited by exnzpat; 12-06-2008, 04:55 AM.
                Erewhon is still erehwon, I don’t see it changing anytime soon.

                http://exnzpat.blogspot.com/

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by exnzpat View Post

                  Don’t take my word for it – call your friendly bank manager today and ask him what the bank does when the market value of your home falls below your mortgage note value i.e. the amount you owe. You won’t like the answer.
                  Banks did it in the late 19th century in NZ, it hit both rural and residential property owners. I don't think ringing your friendly bank manager and asking what his bank would do is a good idea, you might make him suspicious!

                  ( maybe ring someone else's friendly bank manager )
                  Last edited by Austrokiwi; 12-06-2008, 01:12 AM. Reason: typo
                  The mission of any business enterprise should include the aim to develop economic conditions rather than simply react to them.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by exnzpat View Post
                    House prices will fall because the majority of New Zealanders holding mortgages cannot afford those mortgages. New Zealanders are overextended.
                    Nonsense.
                    The majority of home owners have no mortgage or very small mortgages.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by tricky View Post
                      Nonsense.
                      The majority of home owners have no mortgage or very small mortgages.
                      ..........the statement was a little global........... I think most would agree that there are a significant number of property owners out there who face mortgage stress
                      The mission of any business enterprise should include the aim to develop economic conditions rather than simply react to them.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Austrokiwi View Post
                        Banks did it in the late 19th century in NZ, it hit both rural and residential property owners. I don't think ringing your friendly bank manager and asking what his bank would do, you might make him suspicious!

                        ( maybe ring someone else's friendly bank manager )

                        Good point. I’ll call yours and you call mine – just don’t give them my name – I’ve been on their blacklist since I told them to take their 2 million dollars (interest only) and shove it!
                        “But, you're good for it” they said.
                        “Sure, in an up-market” I answered, (this was late 2004).

                        In truth, they gave me the money without actually asking me if I wanted it. They told me it was mine, never thinking for a moment that I was not interested. Personally, I was horrified at their audacity. Which brings me back to why this market is teetering on the precipice of Mount Doom. How many other New Zealanders were offered these kinds of deals and stupidly took them?
                        Erewhon is still erehwon, I don’t see it changing anytime soon.

                        http://exnzpat.blogspot.com/

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by tricky View Post
                          Nonsense.
                          The majority of home owners have no mortgage or very small mortgages.

                          ARE YOU SERIOUS?
                          Erewhon is still erehwon, I don’t see it changing anytime soon.

                          http://exnzpat.blogspot.com/

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by exnzpat View Post

                            In truth, they gave me the money without actually asking me if I wanted it. They told me it was mine, never thinking for a moment that I was not interested. Personally, I was horrified at their audacity. Which brings me back to why this market is teetering on the precipice of Mount Doom. How many other New Zealanders were offered these kinds of deals and stupidly took them?
                            These deals: were these enabled by Basel II ( though I didn't think its been fully implemented yet) ?
                            The mission of any business enterprise should include the aim to develop economic conditions rather than simply react to them.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Austrokiwi View Post
                              These deals: were these enabled by Basel II ( though I didn't think its been fully implemented yet) ?

                              I’m not familiar with that name.

                              All I remember was that my wife was in tears because we missed one month of paying to principal.

                              Wealth by reducing debt has always been our goal. We have never understood the concept of increasing debt to increase wealth – it seems contradictory.

                              To us, the bank is no more than a tool that we use to accomplish short-term goals – the long term is entirely up to us.
                              Erewhon is still erehwon, I don’t see it changing anytime soon.

                              http://exnzpat.blogspot.com/

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Basel II

                                http://www.bis.org/publ/bcbsca.htm
                                The mission of any business enterprise should include the aim to develop economic conditions rather than simply react to them.

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