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  • Double glazing

    Hi there

    I have an existing single pane window surrounded by an aluminium frame.

    Is it worth to retro fit double glazing or should I replace the window frame also with a thermal broken aluminium frame?

    Does condensation form on both types of aluminium window frames when the window is double glazed?

    Would condensation form on the wood holding the aluminium frame on both retro fit and non-retro fit double glazing?

    Thanks,

  • #2
    Originally posted by surf09 View Post
    Hi there

    I have an existing single pane window surrounded by an aluminum frame.

    Is it worth to retro fit double glazing or should I replace the window frame also with a thermal broken aluminum frame?

    Does condensation form on both types of aluminum window frames when the window is double glazed?

    Would condensation form on the wood holding the aluminum frame on both retro fit and non-retro fit double glazing?

    Thanks,
    condensation form on any cold surface. It is a function of the amount of moisture in the interior environment.

    Double glazing reduces condensation because it creates a warmer surface that hopefully wont form condensation. (but it still can if cold)This can still occur on any remaining cold surface.

    Condensation on single panes that drains to bottom of window and then to exterior (if there is a drain that also isnt blocked) is removing moisture from the interior. Double glazing is great if you want sound and thermal insulation but you lose this condensation mechanism. If you are still generating internal moisture then you need to get rid of this with heating and ventilation. But if you do this properly you also eliminate the condensation on single glazing that was concerning you in the first place.

    Question is;
    why do you want to double glaze this single window?

    What part of the country are you in?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by John the builder View Post
      condensation form on any cold surface. It is a function of the amount of moisture in the interior environment.

      Double glazing reduces condensation because it creates a warmer surface that hopefully wont form condensation. (but it still can if cold)This can still occur on any remaining cold surface.

      Condensation on single panes that drains to bottom of window and then to exterior (if there is a drain that also isnt blocked) is removing moisture from the interior. Double glazing is great if you want sound and thermal insulation but you lose this condensation mechanism. If you are still generating internal moisture then you need to get rid of this with heating and ventilation. But if you do this properly you also eliminate the condensation on single glazing that was concerning you in the first place.

      Question is;
      why do you want to double glaze this single window?

      What part of the country are you in?
      Thanks for answering my questions.

      I'm based in Manawatu and looking into double glazing to reduce condensation and have a warmer home.

      If I installed a ventilation system like HRV what is the best way to combine heat and a ventilation system to remove condensation?

      E.g. leave heater on during the evening until before going to sleep and have the ventilation system running all evening and overnight?

      Thanks,

      Comment


      • #4
        I dont agree with HRV approach
        Taking air from ceiling space is ill conceived and the times when it is drier that interior is limited and not when you want it dry (summer)? but it does circulate air and even out damp areas perhaps

        Passive input ventilation with a moisture control is better

        Double glazing south of Auckland makes sense. But if you double glaze are the rest of the walls insulated?
        Last edited by John the builder; 14-10-2016, 08:30 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by John the builder View Post
          I dont agree with HRV approach
          Taking air from ceiling space is ill conceived and the times when it is drier that interior is limited and not when you want it dry (summer)? but it does circulate air and even out damp areas perhaps

          Passive input ventilation with a moisture control is better

          Double glazing south of Auckland makes sense. But if you double glaze are the rest of the walls insulated?
          Yes, walls and ceiling are insulated.

          Comment


          • #6
            Good video here showing all different types of glass glazing and which are best: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o78940u_pww
            Squadly dinky do!

            Comment

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