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Extremely poor shower pressure

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  • Extremely poor shower pressure

    I'm looking for information leading to the title of this post. We have unequal pressure in a current property we're living in and rennoing for a rental once we're done. It has unequal water pressure. Just put a new shower in, and used a venturi valved shower mixer to try create the best experience when showering with the average pressure we have.

    It seems that the hot - cold crossover is a matter of a few millimeters of adjustments on the mixer eg, you can have it on full hot (which isn't overly hot anyway for some reason, can stand under it just) and try mix in some cold but you've got a few millimeters before you're just completely cold, without any real mixing ability.

    So therefore I'm thinking it renders the venturi valve in the mixer redundant as it doesn't get a chance to use it?

    Horrible explanation I know, but can anyone offer any input as to how to get a better showering experience or WHY it doesn't have much adjustment on the mixer?

    Thanks

  • #2
    I don't know the unit you describe, but is there any sort of stop / control valve on the shower unit at the inlet point for each pipe?
    Want a great looking concrete swimming pool in Hawke's Bay? Designer Pools will do the job for you!

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    • #3
      If its a Felton shower mixer they use a very good Venturi System ,ive never had any issues with them and they are generally great for unequal pressure systems like the one you describe. The Felton has the mixer and the shower head all together. Possibly you have not set it properly. Check the hot water flow from the bath tub or vanity to see how it compares.
      If the temperature of the hot water is not overly hot you can adjust this from the Hot Water Cylinder thermostat which is located at the bottom of the HWC. 55 degrees Centigrade is the usual setting. Some older thermostats are marked in Fahrenheit so use the conversion it is 131 Fahrenheit. It is not recommended to set higher as this can scold.

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      • #4
        55 degrees is too low.
        This is the correct outlet temperature if you have a tempering valve but water should be stored at over 60 to stop Legionaires desease (or Legionella bacteria).
        So ideally you store at 65 and feed, via the tempering valve, at 55.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Wayne View Post
          55 degrees is too low.
          This is the correct outlet temperature if you have a tempering valve but water should be stored at over 60 to stop Legionaires desease (or Legionella bacteria).
          So ideally you store at 65 and feed, via the tempering valve, at 55.
          True, i stand corrected. Set it at 60 centigrade [140 Fanrenheit] a minimum temperature of 60 centigrade [140°F] is required at which Legionellae dies in 32 minutes. Hence it is recommended that the water heater be set at a temperature of 140°F. The Legionella disinfection range is 158 – 176 °F.
          Last edited by mrsaneperson; 13-07-2016, 06:16 PM.

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          • #6
            I have just done some research and all you need to do is replace the cylinder with a mains pressure one.


            cheers,

            Donna
            Last edited by donna; 14-07-2016, 08:28 PM.
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            • #7
              Originally posted by donna View Post
              I have just done some research and all you need to do is replace the cylinder with a mains pressure one.


              cheers,

              Donna
              That's a very expensive non-necessary solution costing on average $2500. I had a plumber recommend to me installing a mains pressure HWC to replace a low pressure one after he'd botched up installing a new shower - the pressure coming from the faucet was much lower than compared with the original old installation - turns out he had caused this himself by using a wrong plumbing fixture. He only found this out after i did my own homework on the install. He put the correct fixture in and whammo pressure all good. Saved me $2500!

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              • #8
                Yeah okay that's makes sense.

                BTW - since we're on water pressure etc...I want to neg. down on a property and I'm keen to know what you think....

                Would you pay less for a property with a low pressure cylinder? Could it be used to lower the purchase price?


                cheers,


                donna
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by donna View Post
                  BTW - since we're on water pressure etc...I want to neg. down on a property and I'm keen to know what you think....

                  Would you pay less for a property with a low pressure cylinder? Could it be used to lower the purchase price?
                  It costs $2500 to replace the cylinder.
                  Include it in the list of faults and total it up.
                  Might help reduce the price.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by donna View Post
                    Yeah okay that's makes sense.

                    BTW - since we're on water pressure etc...I want to neg. down on a property and I'm keen to know what you think....

                    Would you pay less for a property with a low pressure cylinder? Could it be used to lower the purchase price?


                    cheers,


                    donna


                    Probably not - they still sell the low pressure cylinders and in many houses they seem to work just as adequately as the mains pressure ones. Some of the flow restrictors that they insert in the shower head nozzles can cause inadequate water pressure too ,i usually remove these. If its an old house with single glazing you could negotiate a better price if you tell them you would be looking at replacing with double glazing. That runs into the 15-20k mark to do a 3 bedroom house.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by donna View Post
                      I want to neg. down on a property and I'm keen to know what you think....

                      Would you pay less for a property with a low pressure cylinder? Could it be used to lower the purchase price?
                      It is what it is.
                      You can use the low pressure HWC as a bargaining chip just as much as the lounge colour.
                      It is hardly a fault.

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                      • #12
                        Does anyone know how much you can sell an old cylinder for and to what kind of people? What's the cost of installing a new one?

                        The water pressure in my house sucks, winter just makes it worse. I want to change but it seems such a waste because it's working fine.

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                        • #13
                          Usually few hundred dollars, depends on cylinder's age and volume.
                          I know a man in Manurewa who buys and sells used cylinders, you may check his listings on TradeMe to get an idea of prices:
                          http://www.trademe.co.nz/Members/Lis...member=1551711

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Connor View Post
                            Does anyone know how much you can sell an old cylinder for and to what kind of people? What's the cost of installing a new one?

                            The water pressure in my house sucks, winter just makes it worse. I want to change but it seems such a waste because it's working fine.
                            Why blame the cylinder? Does you installation have what's called a three-in-one inflow valve? If so, it contains a filter that may need cleaning.
                            The pressure reducing feed valve, then the pressure relief valve (if fitted) should be investigated next. Then the tempering valve - if fitted. Followed by considering pipe restrictions.

                            Poor water pressure is not a factor of your cylinder. It's only there for storage purposes.
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                            • #15
                              We just fit a pump on hot water cylinder purchased off TM.......works well, good pressure...

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