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Cedar Stain 1973 - water or oil based - and how can you tell ?

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  • Cedar Stain 1973 - water or oil based - and how can you tell ?

    Is the black stain water or oil based, is there a way you can tell ?
    If we paint water based over oil, or the other way around, what are the implications ?


  • #2
    Hi Paul hope your well, ask a Resenes trade rep to take a look for you - PM me if you want any help mate, tell them you will be painting the place and are a MTP client etc.. Be carefull we had a major c..k up when we painted over a oil based paint last year - took 6 weeks to do a job that should have taken 2 - just like your place shown. Someone had used engine oil in places - hows that !!

    cheers

    Mark Trafford

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    • #3
      My partner was told to use turps on an area by a painter but sorry Im not sure what result ment oil.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Reno Man View Post
        Hi Paul hope your well, ask a Resenes trade rep to take a look for you - PM me if you want any help mate, tell them you will be painting the place and are a MTP client etc.. Be carefull we had a major c..k up when we painted over a oil based paint last year - took 6 weeks to do a job that should have taken 2 - just like your place shown. Someone had used engine oil in places - hows that !!

        cheers

        Mark Trafford
        Hi Mark,

        Thanks for that.
        I just grabbed my test pot and it is water based.
        That soaked in, but it required a massive amount of paint.
        Is that just thirsty cedar, or oil based stain rejecting the water based ???

        Resene trade rep on shore would be ?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bluekiwi View Post
          Hi Mark,

          Thanks for that.
          I just grabbed my test pot and it is water based.
          That soaked in, but it required a massive amount of paint.
          Is that just thirsty cedar, or oil based stain rejecting the water based ???

          Resene trade rep on shore would be ?
          Not sure - ring Albany and ask them if they can send somoen out or to speak to someone about it. Thats a lot of labour then ....

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          • #6
            Not sure when it was last done but its a 1996 house and it didn't soak it up very quickly, took two coats tho to make it look good.

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            • #7
              Well, we supposedly learn every day something new – so did I, when I heard the first time that “somebody” under contract stained a house with Turpentine mixed old engine oil. Believe it, it looked good (possibly an old farmer’s trick). The problem with that is the iron from engine wear & tear that covers the surface and can cause issues when topping up with water-based paint.

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              • #8
                Ok so if it comes off with turps its water based apparently.

                People commonly use engine oil or creosote on horse fencing.

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                • #9
                  Safest would be to use turps base.
                  get a small pot ,find an area out of the way and test.
                  It will drink up the stain esp. on first coat---It sometimes takes 3

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                  • #10
                    it was probably turps based anyway in 73.
                    If it happens to be motor oil -turps would still be the way to go

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Maccachic View Post
                      Ok so if it comes off with turps its water based apparently.

                      People commonly use engine oil or creosote on horse fencing.
                      Incorrect I think, turps for oil, meths for water based. If you think about it, turps is what
                      you use when cleaning up oil paint brushes.

                      Those black walls look pretty gnarly. If you're lucky none of it is black fungus like I'm getting.
                      Last edited by kapitibeanman; 15-12-2012, 10:55 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by kapitibeanman View Post
                        Incorrect I think, turps for oil, meths for water based. If you think about it, turps is what
                        you use when cleaning up oil paint brushes.

                        Those black walls look pretty gnarly. If you're lucky none of it is black fungus like I'm getting.
                        Yep-Its always best to get it chemwashed before staining,so yo9ur nstarting with the best possible surface

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by skid View Post
                          Yep-Its always best to get it chemwashed before staining,so yo9ur nstarting with the best possible surface
                          My guy douses all surfaces with 30 seconds, then comes back for a light waterblast.
                          Takes about a day, then comes back to paint the next day.

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                          • #14
                            Also its best to start and finish one board at a time-if you start and stop,and then continue ,you can sometimes get an ugly area where you have started again.
                            It may be a bit of a challenge on those long vertical runs.
                            Stain has a tendency to splatter so definitely need to protect those roofs.

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                            • #15
                              I hope its very light waterblasters should not be used on houses.

                              Water blasters can damage your home

                              There is growing concern at the damage that water blasters can cause when used to clean the outsides of buildings – especially New Zealand houses.
                              Where water blasters were once the preserve of professional cleaning specialists, now anyone can buy one at the local hardware store, or hire one, and without any knowledge or understanding of how to use them properly.
                              While it is important to regularly clean and maintain roof and wall claddings to keep them looking good and prolong their life so they continue to do their job of keeping weather out, it was never intended that this be done with the indiscriminate use of high pressure water blasters.
                              Most claddings are not designed to withstand the water pressures generated by even the smallest water blasters. Most New Zealand homes should be designed to withstand maximum pressures in the 1.5 – 2.5 kPa range, which is the pressure you might expect from a 180 km/hr (or kph) wind gust. But a relatively small 1200 psi water blaster has a nozzle pressure of 8300 kPa that can cause a tremendous ‘punch’ on walls and joints!
                              The materials, joints and seals used for cladding the average New Zealand house are simply not designed to withstand these excessively high pressures. Water blasters can etch out soft weatherboard, tear out mortar from brick joints, knock off paint film along cladding edges, dislodge sealant, force water into joints where water would never otherwise get to, etch away paint film thickness – and much more. If the building did not leak before it was ‘cleaned’ by water blasting, there is a high chance it will afterwards. Where buildings are regularly cleaned in this way, parts of them may never get a chance to dry out, and decay of materials and framing could result.
                              Water blasters, used indiscriminately, will damage your home. There are, of course, occasions where the proper use of water blasters, on some materials, may be appropriate. But the best method of cleaning the house will always be with the garden hose and a soft brush or broom.
                              However, if you are going to use a water blaster, there are some simple rules you should follow to reduce the risk of damaging claddings and joints.
                              • Always read the operating instructions first.
                              • Check the maintenance requirements of your cladding or roofing material – many exclude the use of high pressure cleaning (ie, water blasters).
                              • Use the lowest pressure setting available.
                              • Set the nozzle on ‘wide spray’ and maintain it at least 500 mm clear of the building’s surfaces.
                              • Don’t hold the nozzle up close to a surface to dislodge stubborn dirt – use a brush or broom for that.
                              • Never point the nozzle directly at joints or aluminium joinery, because many of these rely on sealants for their weathertightness, which can be dislodged by high pressures.
                              • Use cold water only.
                              • Use infrequently. It is better to wash down your home more frequently with a low-pressure garden hose and soft broom
                                than to use high-pressure water blasters occasionally.

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