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  • Bathroom floors + walls

    Hello!
    Quick question regarding bathroom renovation (own home)
    The whole room is going to be relined.

    When fitting the bath. Are you supposed to place it before wall linings up against the studs. Or should you line the walls first then place the bath.
    I have seen pictures of both.. unsure which is "correct"

    Bathroom floor. Our house has rimu floors which have all been covered. We are slowly uncovering and having them sanded and polished.
    Right now the bathroom has cork tiles. We want to pull them up and polyurethane the bathroom floor.

    Some say its a bad idea to have wooden floors in a bathroom. Is there anything special we can add to the polyurethane process to improve its watertightness?

    Thanks in advance

  • #2
    Sorry can't help with your Bath question - although just did have one put in, it wasn't me who actually fitted it.

    Some say its a bad idea to have wooden floors in a bathroom. Is there anything special we can add to the polyurethane process to improve its watertightness?


    This is the first I've hear of this. Generally speaking, your old character type homes have wooden floors and there seems to be no problems with those. My place (only been there two weeks) has wooden floors and I went under the house before I purchased and couldn't find anything obvious at all. I would have thought the polyurethane acts are a water type membrane to protect the wood?

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    • #3
      He's right about the urethane, but make sure it goes on relatively thick, and bear in mind that it does wear away over time.

      And wear breathing gear or you'll be away with the fairies (after losing a few million brain cells in the process). Fun, for a while.

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      • #4
        No help on either of your questions but just wanted to put in a plug for insulating the walls while you're at it. I reckon it's worth stuffing pink batts around the bath too. Keeps the water warm longer.

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        • #5
          if you have a shower over the bath recess it into the wall so whatever your lining it with fits over the top of the flange on the bath, one of my bathrooms has polyurethaned TnG and one drawback is the boards move over time and split the coating, im going to tile mine one day, after the 7000 other jobs are done

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          • #6
            If you talk to a floor sander he will know the best method, i have seen hundreds of bahtrooms with polished wooden floors that are fine even when the coating is starting to peel, tiles or vynil over particleboard is a diffrent story tho

            As for the bath check with the manufactures specs, but the many i have done it is common/best practice to set the bath against the wall framing and have the gib sitting over top on the up stand, dont forget to have solid fixing around the bath. Have your wall coverings weather it be a wall liner tiles etc run past the upstand to the lip of the bath and be sealed. If its just a bath you need a min of 400mm up stand to be waterproof acting as a splash back, the top of the splash back/shower liner also has to be sealed. Dont smooth/remove excess silicon with your finger this allows bacteria to set inside the wet silicon then it can turn black and mouldy, use a glove or spatula it takes a bit of practice to get it looking perfect.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Vai-man View Post
              Dont smooth/remove excess silicon with your finger this allows bacteria to set inside the wet silicon then it can turn black and mouldy, use a glove or spatula it takes a bit of practice to get it looking perfect.
              Bunnings has packs of "sealant edges" - these things: http://www.alibaba.com/product-gs/24...s_Blister.html. You pick the corner diameter you want and scrape it along your line of sealant. Works amazingly well!

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              • #8
                Jim O has it right. ideally you should put the bath in before the wall lining. It could be done after gib which could be cut away before installation but it must be done before final waterproof lining because that goes down over the flange or lip if no upward flange is present. If there is just a lip you should put a line of sealant on the lip then nail a board about 50x20 mm to the studs. The outside of the board has sealant on then your waterproof lining comes down over the board to 1mm off the bath.
                Last edited by [email protected]; 28-01-2012, 01:14 PM.
                Doug

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                • #9
                  It's the laminated wooden floors that you shouldn't put in bathrooms. Real wooden floors such as yours no problem at all. A stand alone bath would go well rather than a boxed in one. Check out the trend magazines.
                  Profiting from Property, not People

                  Want free help on taking your portfolio to the next level?

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                  • #10
                    Thank you everyone. Very helpful information!

                    I can rest easy over the floors. I realise I must have been reading about laminate flooring. not good old T&G rimu!

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                    • #11
                      Bath goes in first then line over the top. As for the floor, fill up all the gaps then polyurethane it with a spirit based poly.

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                      • #12
                        Installed baths are hideous. Just tile the lot and put in a free-standing modern bath.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TheLiberalLeft View Post
                          Installed baths are hideous. Just tile the lot and put in a free-standing modern bath.
                          Depends on how much you want to spend, if you have a generous budget and plenty of room then go for the free standing bath and the expensive tap ware required, however for something that hardly anybody uses these days why go to the expense if you don't have to?
                          I don't even put baths into new builds these days, they are usually only used to hang the bathmat over and they gather dust and human hairs.......even some from your head!

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                          • #14
                            A nice soak in a tub is good. I hear a lot of parents want baths for children, one of my collegues (foreign) is moving rentals due to no bath for his child (who arrives in NZ soon)

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Maccachic View Post
                              A nice soak in a tub is good. I hear a lot of parents want baths for children, one of my collegues (foreign) is moving rentals due to no bath for his child (who arrives in NZ soon)
                              For a good soak and the same cost I would personally myself put in a spa pool. I manage 150 apartments that have a shower only and lots of foreigners with children and no bath. I had my children in Singapore, no bath, didn't miss it until I returned to NZ.
                              If you can afford the cost of having daily baths then great but most adults shower. My parents in their mid 70's NEVER use their bath and haven't had a soak in one for over 10 years. Too hard to get in and out of. Would rather put my money into a nice big walk in or walk through tiled shower.

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