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28,000 NZ homes always damp & mouldy

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  • 28,000 NZ homes always damp & mouldy

    Is this another of those "read-and-weep" tales? One eagerly soaked up and regurgitated by the stuff of NZ's terminally gullible media, on taxpayer-funded life-support? (Perhaps it's time to turn it off?)

    Without knowing the terms of reference and without a reasonably searching analysis of the lifestyles of the occupants, this 'report' is worse-than-useless.

    I wonder if questions were asked like:

    * do you know what a dehumidifier is?
    * do you open the windows to air the house?
    * do you wipe down the windows and mop up the condensation on cold mornings?
    * do you draw out the shower curtain to dry, after a shower?

    Probably not. Might be considered an invasion of privacy.

    And might skew the report from the desired [villify LLs] result, of course.

    28,000 New Zealand homes always damp and mouldy: Housing report
    08 Dec 2020

    Originally posted by Stuff
    Large portions of New Zealand’s housing stock are cold, mouldy and damp, making those that live in them more likely to have physical and mental health issues, according to an analysis of housing quality in New Zealand. It found renters were more likely to experience dampness and mould than home owners and Housing New Zealand homes were even more likely to be damp or mouldy (or both). However, there was no significant difference in insulation between owned homes and rentals.
    I wonder if that last sentence told the report-writers anything at all?


    I thought that these, LPG-type heaters were banned in some way?

    Originally posted by Stuff
    Dampness (some or all the time) was most common in dwellings heated with both an electric heater (not a heat pump) and a portable gas heater (39.9 per cent).
    Want a great looking concrete swimming pool in Hawke's Bay? Designer Pools will do the job for you!

  • #2
    Nice post Perry and well done on

    The difference between our older homes and say those in the UK is we don’t have central heating to keep homes dry.

    Plus even though 80+% of our electricity is renewable it’s ridiculously expensive especially when compared with the UK.

    Heating and dry indoor conditions are a given even in the cheapest properties in the UK. This means the residents don’t have to think about how to keep their home dry.

    Their central heating is on all the time they don’t have to remember to turn heating on and off etc.

    You won’t find a wet home when it has the HRV system as once again it’s set and forget.

    But it is expensive to install. The HH standards should have been in place years ago and applicable to all homes.

    cheers

    Donna
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    • #3
      Originally posted by donna View Post
      N

      [...] The HH standards should have been in place years ago and applicable to all homes.

      cheers

      Donna

      I agree and how nice - not to mention beneficial - it would have been, if New Zealand had had a decent building code.

      Years of building with untreated soft woods, cladding systems which weren't weathertight, roofs with no eaves, weak and relatively short material warranties etc.

      Insulation wasn't even required until the late 70's. The lack of insulation through most of the 1970s (ditto BTW for houses built between the 1940's through 1960's) – combined with large areas of single-glazed windows – meant that many houses were quite naturally - cold in winter. Today, these are landlord problems.



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      • #4


        Some smart group of Architects need to design the perfect standardized landlord's bilding.

        With the exact balance between minimal material cost, heating cost, and ventilation cost.
        And low maintenance cost.

        Get it built tested, then approved by all councils.

        Make the prefect product for landlords to buy and rent out.

        Vertical integration.

        If the council and govt also got on board, by offering special tax deals or purchase equity incentives..

        It would be the model T ford of landlord housing.

        There's your brief boys, go make yourselves rich.
        Last edited by McDuck; 09-12-2020, 06:48 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Sanya View Post


          I agree and how nice - not to mention beneficial - it would have been, if New Zealand had had a decent building code.

          Years of building with untreated soft woods, cladding systems which weren't weathertight, roofs with no eaves, weak and relatively short material warranties etc.

          Insulation wasn't even required until the late 70's. The lack of insulation through most of the 1970s (ditto BTW for houses built between the 1940's through 1960's) – combined with large areas of single-glazed windows – meant that many houses were quite naturally - cold in winter. Today, these are landlord problems.


          Sanya

          in defence of the building code

          if those houses had been compliant then there would have been no issues so why blame the code?

          ditto the insulation which the building code upgraded But also remeber the sacrifice of ventilation in the wall (now filled with insulation), is part of the cause of leaky homes

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          • #6
            Originally posted by John the builder View Post
            if those houses had been compliant then there would have been no issues so why blame the code?
            The NZ building code was proven deficient both in terms of standards and compliance. We know this for a fact because the building code was revamped following controversy over building performance in New Zealand.

            A report commissioned by the Government in 2002 (“The Hunn Report”) to investigate the causes of widespread building failures in New Zealand due to moisture ingress, nominated a significant number of contributory causes including; the inadequacy in the Building Code and approved documents; insufficient checking at building consent stage and inadequacy of building products, materials and components including evaluation of their suitability of fitness for purpose.


            Originally posted by John the builder View Post
            But also remeber the sacrifice of ventilation in the wall (now filled with insulation), is part of the cause of leaky homes
            Yes, thus the introduction of B2/AS1 as a means of compliance with Building Code Clause B2 Durability and the subsequent increase in use of drained and vented cavities behind exterior claddings.

            Comment


            • #7
              Some Ponsonby villas were built over 100 years ago.
              The building code was different back then.
              So, what building code are ya'll talkin about?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by McDuck View Post
                Some Ponsonby villas were built over 100 years ago.
                The building code was different back then.
                LoL. There was no building code back then.

                Comment


                • #9
                  HH Standards Will Not Solve The Problem

                  I recall living in (and bringing up two children in) an uninsulated, single glazed state house. (New when we moved in - probably around 1970-71). There was never a problem with mould. We knew the need for airing a house, drying window condensation on cold mornings and keeping the house warm. We had an open fire and despite it's inherent inefficiencies, we kept warm and dry. Oddly enough, we were very grateful for what we got. Seems everyone these days is looking for a whipping boy for all manner of problems associated with a lack of house-life-skills.

                  After grumbles about a mouldy shower curtain, I recall the tenant being bemused / shocked when I said (and showed) that the shower curtain needed to be fully extended after use, so it could drip dry and not promote mould growth as it did when scrunched up.

                  That the NZ housing report averred that State houses were up there with the worst should indicate something to someone with more than half a brain. Many State house occupants have little-to-no life skills, especially as they relate to keeping house. But no one wants to pursue any detail - just blame someone else. Analytical depth might reveal certain home truths which would be inconsistent with the current socio-commie gummint's LL-bashing agenda.

                  Want a great looking concrete swimming pool in Hawke's Bay? Designer Pools will do the job for you!

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                  • #10
                    Well, where did you get your house care skills?
                    And why aren't they in the heads of some renters?

                    Do you think you could put together a house care training program?
                    - and become beloved at every school around the country by doing presentations.

                    Hint, free gingerbread houses with icing and smarties would be a good closer.




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                    • #11
                      It gets worse . . .

                      Towards the end of that pseudo-intellectual-pseudo-investigative-hack-journo-Xmas-filler item is this:
                      Originally posted by Stuffed
                      In a paper written for the Canterbury Law Review in 2013, Barry Barton, from the Faculty of Law at the University of Waikato, said the Housing Improvement Regulations were seen as prescriptive and dated, but, he said: “For all of that unease and difficulty, the duty to enforce is entirely clear; the Health Act 1956 empowers and directs every local body to enforce the regulations within its district.”

                      That enforcement would be for both rental properties, and also owner-occupied homes.

                      In 2018 a “stocktake” by the government indicated there were around 687,000 renting households, including 82,000 social housing units.
                      See that bit in bold? That's why councils don't want a bar of it!
                      Want a great looking concrete swimming pool in Hawke's Bay? Designer Pools will do the job for you!

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                      • #12
                        Yeah the cost would be huge and the elected councillors ousted come election time.
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