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  • Originally posted by JBM View Post

    I think we will be forced to halt the major rising in rates going forward as far too many kiwis hit the wall and default
    How many is too many?

    Rates may keep going up,.... because central bankers are playing a larger scale game than you imagine.
    (They're playing for the survival of an empire).

    How's that for a cryptic titbit...



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    • Yes ... I understand Bankrupting many nations and populations could well be the Global Agenda reset plan ..as no way many of these massively in-debt nations can continue to pay interest and roll over Debts as they move well north of GDP of nations.. Its all just going one way .. Buy real assets that give strong returns

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      • Originally posted by JBM View Post
        Yes ... I understand Bankrupting many nations and populations could well be the Global Agenda reset plan ..as no way many of these massively in-debt nations can continue to pay interest and roll over Debts as they move well north of GDP of nations.. Its all just going one way .. Buy real assets that give strong returns
        It's my idea, and it's just a gut instinct, that they are going to try something totally new this time around.
        All you need to know that they need to unwind all that "extra money" they put into the system.

        That "extra money" was what was pumping bitcoin and stocks and houses.

        Was.

        You'll be looking at a totally new financial landscape.
        But with totally new opportunities too.

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        • Originally posted by JBM View Post
          Yes ... Buy real assets that give strong returns
          Returns of any sort predicate that someone can pay for them. That caveat said, I generally agree.

          Money in the bank is a total waste. Pay real tax, then inflation 'tax.' (Also known as eroded / diminished purchasing power.)

          Just under three years ago, I spent $40k on a bit of "real assets" stuff.

          Said 'stuff' has gone up in cost price by over 50%. If it can be obtained at all.

          And in the meantime, it's hired and earning one helluva lot more than would the money in the bank.

          Want a great looking concrete swimming pool in Hawke's Bay? Designer Pools will do the job for you!

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          • Originally posted by Perry View Post

            Pay real tax, then inflation 'tax.' (Also known as eroded / diminished purchasing power.)
            Ha!

            I like it.

            I totally agree.

            Debt causes inflation, inflation is a secret tax.

            As it takes a collusion between Treasury, the Reserve Bank and the Trading Banks to make happen.

            You'll have to give them full points for misdirecting the attention away from themselves and towards workers asking for more money or supermarkets scalping on prices.

            Such an beautiful bit of misdirection.







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            • A 15% drop seems very large compared to history, but to put it in context, it would only take average prices back to where they were at the start of 2021.
              Fixed-term mortgages were closer to the peak than the trough of this cycle but shorter fixed terms in particular still had some way to rise.
              Interesting update from WestPac economist. So OCR could go to 4% - house prices drop 15% by end of 2023. As you say here - peaking in 2023 and an easing back - but by how much is the unknown.

              cheers,

              Donna
              Home loan interest rates have risen further than expected, prompting the bank to increase its forecast for a fall.
              SEARCH PropertyTalk, About PropertyTalk

              BusinessBlogs - the best business articles are found here

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              • Originally posted by donna View Post



                Interesting update from WestPac economist. So OCR could go to 4% - house prices drop 15% by end of 2023. As you say here - peaking in 2023 and an easing back - but by how much is the unknown.

                cheers,

                Donna
                I cant see any point in fixing long atm. Most of the loans are coming off in August this year, and buy the time they come off another year I expect them to flatten or decline. Hopefully
                Last edited by Frezzinghot; 09-05-2022, 03:47 PM.
                "DEBT BECOMES IRRELEVANT WITH INFLATION".

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                • My loans or melons? Ahhh, the wonders of predictive / phone-dictated text.
                  Want a great looking concrete swimming pool in Hawke's Bay? Designer Pools will do the job for you!

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                  • Originally posted by Frezzinghot View Post

                    I cant see any point in fixing long atm. Most of the loans are coming off in August this year, and buy the time they come off another year I expect them to flatten or decline. Hopefully
                    Do you still think this will happen?
                    SEARCH PropertyTalk, About PropertyTalk

                    BusinessBlogs - the best business articles are found here

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                    • Originally posted by donna View Post

                      Do you still think this will happen?
                      Yeah id be right in about 12 months.
                      "DEBT BECOMES IRRELEVANT WITH INFLATION".

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                      • Yeah locked in one small loan 4.49% with Westpac for 1yr coming due 23 JUL22 ... this was after getting 2.19% 1yr fixed last year .... planning to pay off my other loan ... thanks to the sharemarket gains

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                        • Originally posted by Jeffa View Post

                          2022/23 you will still be able to find rates in the 2% range.

                          Stop be greedy my first mortgage was 7%.
                          NOPE >>> make that 4%++
                          Last edited by Perry; 26-05-2022, 10:18 AM. Reason: fixed typo

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