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  1. #1

    Question Cost of Floor Sanding per Square Meter

    Can anyone tell me a reasonable price to floor sand and polish wooden floors. I have a 130sqm house and I'm getting quotes of $3000-$4000. Does this seem high?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,156

    Default

    Nope, seems to be reasonable. Had one quote $20 per sqm for 50 sqm house, 3 coats. Ended up with 4 coats + floor praparation, same $1000+GST. Taht's in Chch.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    4,020

    Default

    That sounds about right.

    Have you considered doing it yourself? (I'm not sure if you're in the same city as the property.) I did my own floors, around 100m2 in total. It cost me well under $1000, and it looks just like a bought one. If you're interested in some advice on how to sand your own floors, you can send me a personal message.

    Your friendly D-I-Yer,

    Paul.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,156

    Default

    I would be happy to jump on it too Paul
    but I see myself as property investor, not floor sander!
    So if I do reno I project management and maybe a bit of cean-up, everything else is done by pro's while I'm looking for another deal!
    I would quite happily outsource project management too, to be honest!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    4,020

    Default

    Hi Ivanhoe,

    Good point!

    In my situation (still researching our first trade), I'll be doing as much of the reno on our first properties as possible, but only if a cost-benefit analysis justifies this. For example, I'd do the floors myself, because for a three-day job I can do it for 3K cheaper than a pro. That's 1K a day, which is good money. But say some landscaping (excavation) needs doing. That would be too time consuming for me - I could dig by hand and ship the crap out by the trailer or skip load, or the pros could bring in the big guns (digger, trucks). And I won't be able to do everything myself inside the turn-around time-frame, so I'll have to sub-contract some jobs I could do myself.

    I will get to the point one day where I don't need to do as much hands-on work - I can't wait! (In fact, I'm not waiting. I'm taking action now to ensure that this happens in the furture.)

    Paul.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,156

    Default

    Paul, I hear what you say.
    It's your game so you set the rules, including amount of hands-on work. One of guys who's approach I really respect (he has not got a book published and not in NZ anymore) taught me to be really un-emotional and quite anal when doing investment. He called ANY house "unit" ("I settled on 26 units this month") and played purely by numbers.
    I'm not discussing YOUR rules here, rather I'm trying to find out why mine are different.
    You can do renovations yourself, saves heaps. And this approach also tru to kiwi nature too. My concern is it's also tru that majority of investors here in NZ have one, two, maybe three properties (I know a guy who accumulated FIVE!!! and done them up himself over last 12 years or so).
    So my approach (or rather approach I'm adopting) is quite lateral - do as much as possible using other people's time-money-skills etc. Become very good in couple of MAIN things (finding properties and finacing them would be my choice) and use someone to do the rest. Adopt "cost of business" idea - if I have to pay extra $$ but move it faster and easier - fine by me, also you contribute to the economy of the country giving work to all these trades ppl.
    Will you first first deal be profitable ONLY if you do all that work yourself? Maybe it's not THAT good after all...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    4,020

    Default

    Ivanhoe,

    I hear what you say also, especially when you wrote:
    Will you first first deal be profitable ONLY if you do all that work yourself? Maybe it's not THAT good after all.
    Like you, for me it comes down to time and money at the end of the day. Say I want to come out of my first deal clearing $30K. If I go completely "hands-off", then it might take me 6 weeks to find a deal that stacks up, and 3 weeks to turn it over (i.e., have it back on the market). If I go "hands-on", then it might take me 2 weeks to find a deal, and 4 weeks to turn it over. I've made 3 weeks - I can go fishing or find more deals!!! (Although I guess I could have done the same for the 3 weeks it takes the professionals to renovate, so I'm no better off there.)

    It comes down to how I want to spend my time - finding those deals that stack up taking into consideration the cost of getting pros to do work I can do myself, or finding deals that will stack up only if I do the work. To tell the truth, I haven't done enough research to find which of these two scenarios is the more likely. It does seem to me that, at this stage of the market, profit margins are tighter and so it makes sense to do the manual work myself. Deals that stack up will simply be easier to find if I do this. In a rising market the deals will be more plentiful, and so I could spend my time sourcing deals and managing projects.

    I'm not wedded to either way of doing things on my first deal, I'll just see what is out there.

    Thanks for sharing your take on matters - it causes me to be more reflective about my own approach.

    Paul.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    127

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SuperDad

    If you're interested in some advice on how to sand your own floors, you can send me a personal message.

    Your friendly D-I-Yer,

    Paul.
    I'd like that advice, please. I once sanded my partner's house while he was in hospital. I still get the blushes when I go to his house and see the strange welts where the machine dug into the floor...

    Personally, I rather enjoy putting in a bit of ellbow grease now and then. I agree that it would be better to have lots of experience in reno's and trading, so that I can outsource everything. Yep, that day will come. In the meantime, Paul, what is the trick with that darned sander??

    cheers
    Mary
    Mary Jaksch, Nelson

  9. #9

    Default the trick to avoid the gouges

    is to have the sander moving forward before you lower the drum. When you go to the hire shop, test the sanders on offer and choose the one with the smoothest raise/lower lever. You use that lever a lot when finishing up, and you want to preserve the hand that operates it, so make sure it moves freely too.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Wellington
    Posts
    155

    Default

    Hi guys

    I run a floorsanding business so if you need any advice, I can help. Our rates are: $31.50 per sqm, but I'd be charging around $25 per sqm for 130 sqm floor. So the $4k quotes, are a little on the high side, but those floorsanders are probably really busy that's why they are charging that. They don't need the work.

    Depends really what city you are in, and how many floorsanders are in your city to what price you are going to get. I know that more and more floorsanders in Wellington are charging $600 minimum, even for bathrooms and toilets. That's only because they don't want to do them, because they are fiddley and some toilets are disgusting. My partner sands toilets for $350 but it comes with the dry retching too!

    The ditches in the floor are caused by the drum sander not moving. You must keep moving. Quite often if you hire a sander, they will be out of balance, and you will get little ridges going across the floor. These aren't your fault, it's the sander and they are called chatter marks. The wheels might have grit in the them, or there is something else out of balance.

    If you have left over glue on the floor, you can sand it off with a 16 grit paper.

    Any questions, just ask

    Cheers, Queen Bee
    If you go parachuting, and your parachute doesn't open, and your friends are all watching you fall, I think a funny gag would be to pretend you were swimming.


 

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